Monitoring and Reporting Feedback

We want to know what you think we should prioritise when it comes to monitoring resource consents and the subsequent reporting.

Contributions to this feedback are closed for evaluation and review.

Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CME) is an essential business function for Environment Canterbury and we need to ensure it is delivered to the very highest standard that meets community and stakeholder expectations, and delivers good outcomes for the environment. To meet your expectations, we need to know:

  • How high of a priority each resource consent monitoring activity should be
  • Where you think we should focus our community advice and education
  • How well you feel we report on each topic
  • How often would you like us to report.

Environment Canterbury uses a range of tools to undertake our Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement duties. These include:

  • Regulatory tools - ensuring compliance of plans and the associated rules and enforcement
  • Non-regulatory tools - through advice, education and support to make necessary changes.

Our regulatory tools are found in our Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Guidelines. When developing plans, consideration is given to how they can be implemented, and the combination of regulatory and non-regulatory tools that will be required.

We want to know what you think we should prioritise when it comes to monitoring resource consents and the subsequent reporting.

Contributions to this feedback are closed for evaluation and review.

Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CME) is an essential business function for Environment Canterbury and we need to ensure it is delivered to the very highest standard that meets community and stakeholder expectations, and delivers good outcomes for the environment. To meet your expectations, we need to know:

  • How high of a priority each resource consent monitoring activity should be
  • Where you think we should focus our community advice and education
  • How well you feel we report on each topic
  • How often would you like us to report.

Environment Canterbury uses a range of tools to undertake our Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement duties. These include:

  • Regulatory tools - ensuring compliance of plans and the associated rules and enforcement
  • Non-regulatory tools - through advice, education and support to make necessary changes.

Our regulatory tools are found in our Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Guidelines. When developing plans, consideration is given to how they can be implemented, and the combination of regulatory and non-regulatory tools that will be required.

  • Background information

    3 months ago

    A key part of supporting plan implementation is monitoring compliance and undertaking enforcement where required to achieve long term outcomes.

    What we monitor

    As well as monitoring both consented and permitted activities under plans, our staff also respond to pollution events and calls from the community when they’ve seen something having an environmental impact.

    As there’s more than 24,000 consents to monitor, and unfortunately it’s not possible to monitor them all every year so the Council identifies priorities aligned with the Long-Term Plan that guide these activities.

    We recover a large part of monitoring costs from relevant consent holders in...

    A key part of supporting plan implementation is monitoring compliance and undertaking enforcement where required to achieve long term outcomes.

    What we monitor

    As well as monitoring both consented and permitted activities under plans, our staff also respond to pollution events and calls from the community when they’ve seen something having an environmental impact.

    As there’s more than 24,000 consents to monitor, and unfortunately it’s not possible to monitor them all every year so the Council identifies priorities aligned with the Long-Term Plan that guide these activities.

    We recover a large part of monitoring costs from relevant consent holders in accordance with our Fees and Charges Policy, and we also seek to recover costs we incur when responding to incidents.

    Enforcement

    We have several enforcement options to achieve compliance including formal written warnings through to prosecution. Snapshot reports summarising our compliance activities are available on our Monitoring and compliance annual reports section of our website.

    As monitoring technology improves, such as telemetry* for water use data, we are able to monitor more with the resources we have available. We are also working to improve data systems to support our compliance monitoring work.

    Sharing current state/progress information

    When it comes to reporting, we have a statutory obligation to report back on certain measures – and also a desire to share current state/progress information in the areas we know are of interest to the community.


    * telemetry is an automated communications process by which measurements and other data are collected at remote or inaccessible points and transmitted to receiving equipment for monitoring.

  • About Environment Canterbury

    3 months ago

    Environment Canterbury is the regional council for the Canterbury region, which extends from north of Kaikōura to the Waitaki River in the south, and from Banks Peninsula to Aoraki/Mount Cook.

    Canterbury is New Zealand’s largest region, with over 45,000 km2 of diverse landscapes and ecosystems, including alpine and high-country tussock lands, major lakes and river systems, and some of New Zealand’s most productive farmlands.

    The population of Canterbury is estimated to be 612,000 (Stats NZ), with the majority (approximately 500,100) living in Greater Christchurch (the urban areas of Christchurch City and Waimakariri and Selwyn Districts).

    The purpose of New Zealand’s regional and territorial authorities is determined by legislation and central government policy, and by the priorities and aspirations of the communities we serve.

    Environment Canterbury is the regional council for the Canterbury region, which extends from north of Kaikōura to the Waitaki River in the south, and from Banks Peninsula to Aoraki/Mount Cook.

    Canterbury is New Zealand’s largest region, with over 45,000 km2 of diverse landscapes and ecosystems, including alpine and high-country tussock lands, major lakes and river systems, and some of New Zealand’s most productive farmlands.

    The population of Canterbury is estimated to be 612,000 (Stats NZ), with the majority (approximately 500,100) living in Greater Christchurch (the urban areas of Christchurch City and Waimakariri and Selwyn Districts).

    The purpose of New Zealand’s regional and territorial authorities is determined by legislation and central government policy, and by the priorities and aspirations of the communities we serve.

  • Our outcomes

    3 months ago

    Here in Canterbury, we work closely with local community groups, mana whenua, businesses, industry sectors, schools, health boards and other organisations and people who – if we work together – can help the region achieve the outcomes we all want.

    The outcomes that our work contributes to are aspirational, and we cannot achieve them alone. We undertake our work so that, as Cantabrians:

    • we can breathe clear air, play and swim in the rivers, gather mahinga kai, benefit from the productive use of our land, and enjoy Canterbury’s unique biodiversity taonga and landscapes
    • we can live, travel, and move goods...

    Here in Canterbury, we work closely with local community groups, mana whenua, businesses, industry sectors, schools, health boards and other organisations and people who – if we work together – can help the region achieve the outcomes we all want.

    The outcomes that our work contributes to are aspirational, and we cannot achieve them alone. We undertake our work so that, as Cantabrians:

    • we can breathe clear air, play and swim in the rivers, gather mahinga kai, benefit from the productive use of our land, and enjoy Canterbury’s unique biodiversity taonga and landscapes
    • we can live, travel, and move goods with ease, within and to/from the region, facilitating work, leisure and tourism
    • we have access to the information we need to be resilient in the face of short-term hazards and well-prepared
    • for longer-term change to our region’s natural environment we can all help shape the future of Canterbury, leaving a legacy for generations to come.


    In Canterbury we have the advantage of a strong, largely agricultural economy. This comes at a price – and a key part of the role of Environment Canterbury, primary industry agencies, and the rural community, is to retain the benefits of this sector while addressing the pressing needs of our freshwaterways and biodiversity.

    You can find out about our portfolios and what activities are covered by them or by viewing the 2018-28 Long-Term Plan.

    We’ve come a long way from the days when urban and rural industry could discharge waste directly into our rivers and oceans, but we still have work to do.