Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-31

The draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2021–31 (PDF File, 2.0MB) will guide land transport planning and investment within Canterbury. It sets out the state of a region’s transport network, and the challenges and priorities for future investment.

You can have your say on the draft plan until midday on Friday, 5 March. You can provide feedback by filling in the survey or make a detailed written submission via email or post.

About the draft Plan

The proposed Plan has been researched and drafted by the Regional Transport Committee, a collaborative forum of councils and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency. The Committee wants to know whether the draft Plan is in line with the aspirations of the Canterbury community and users of the network.

The Plan outlines increased investment of $5.5 billion over the next decade, up 10% from the previous 10-year plan (PDF File, 2.2MB), and sets new targets for road safety, transport emissions and rail freight.

In particular, it prioritises investment that will:

  • Reduce road deaths and serious injuries
  • Manage demand from growth in population, freight and tourism
  • Shift transport modes to reduce emissions from the transport network
  • Increase resilience to extreme events.

In the first three years, it envisages that $1.4 billion (or about $1 in every five) would be spent on ‘business as usual’ activities and $444 million on regionally-significant improvements. These ‘business as usual activities’ account for the lion’s share of investment into existing infrastructure and services, including the maintenance of local roads and low-cost, low-risk improvements in every district.

Please note that while the draft Plan lists and prioritises transport projects, your feedback cannot change the projects being advanced by Road Controlling Authorities. Any submissions about individual projects will be forwarded to the relevant organisation. The Regional Land Transport Plan is more concerned about articulating the region's transport needs and the criteria for assessing which projects will serve Cantabrians best.

The draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2021–31 (PDF File, 2.0MB) will guide land transport planning and investment within Canterbury. It sets out the state of a region’s transport network, and the challenges and priorities for future investment.

You can have your say on the draft plan until midday on Friday, 5 March. You can provide feedback by filling in the survey or make a detailed written submission via email or post.

About the draft Plan

The proposed Plan has been researched and drafted by the Regional Transport Committee, a collaborative forum of councils and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency. The Committee wants to know whether the draft Plan is in line with the aspirations of the Canterbury community and users of the network.

The Plan outlines increased investment of $5.5 billion over the next decade, up 10% from the previous 10-year plan (PDF File, 2.2MB), and sets new targets for road safety, transport emissions and rail freight.

In particular, it prioritises investment that will:

  • Reduce road deaths and serious injuries
  • Manage demand from growth in population, freight and tourism
  • Shift transport modes to reduce emissions from the transport network
  • Increase resilience to extreme events.

In the first three years, it envisages that $1.4 billion (or about $1 in every five) would be spent on ‘business as usual’ activities and $444 million on regionally-significant improvements. These ‘business as usual activities’ account for the lion’s share of investment into existing infrastructure and services, including the maintenance of local roads and low-cost, low-risk improvements in every district.

Please note that while the draft Plan lists and prioritises transport projects, your feedback cannot change the projects being advanced by Road Controlling Authorities. Any submissions about individual projects will be forwarded to the relevant organisation. The Regional Land Transport Plan is more concerned about articulating the region's transport needs and the criteria for assessing which projects will serve Cantabrians best.